'K' Gallery

Whyte Pic

Whyte

Whyte. This name, with variant spellings White, Whitt, Whyte, Witt(e) and Witts, has two possible origins; the first deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "hwit(a)" meaning white and originally given as a nickname to one with fair hair or pale complexion.

Whyte Pic
Red Petals Pic

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Red Petals Pic
Porphura Pic

Porphura.

The word "purple" comes to us from the Greek via the usual circuitous route through Latin and Old English πορφύραν, porphura, of the mollusk that produced the only bright, deep, color-fast purple dye available in the world until the mid-nineteenth century. The word purple is derived from the Greek porphura, an octopus which yielded purple pigments from which purple dyes were originally manufactured.

Porphura Pic
Pentagrammon

Pentagrammon

Comes from the Greek word "pentagrammon" meaning "five lined" or "five lines." Therefore a pentagram is a five-pointed star drawn with five straight strokes. The pentagram was symbolically used in ancient Greece and Babylonia, and is a pagan symbol associated with the planet Venus - the worship of the goddess Venus.

Pentagrammon
Korumbos Pic

Korumbos

Corymb - (Greek: korumbos = summit) a flat-topped or conve > inflorescence with individual pedicels (flower stalks) branching from various points on the main stem. The outer or lower flowers open first, progressing from the margin inwards, and have the longest stalks so all flowers reach a similar height.

Korumbos Pic
Kardia Pic

Kardia.

(from Greek kardia - heart)before vowels cardi-, word-forming element meaning "pertaining to the heart," from Latinized form of Greek kardia "heart" (see heart).

Kardia Pic
Green Ballare Pic

Green Ballare

to dance / to wobble A vibrant green balletic movement of foliage. The modern English word green comes from the Middle English and Anglo-Saxon word grene, from the same Germanic root as the words "grass" and "grow" It is the color of living grass and leaves and as a result is the color most associated with springtime, growth and nature. The name ballo has its origin in Latin ballo, ballare, meaning "to dance”, which in turn comes from the Greek "βαλλίζω" (ballizo), "to dance, to jump about.

Green Ballare Pic
The Corolla Effect Pic

The Corolla Effect

A corolla is an ancient headdress made of a garland or wreath and worn as a small circlet or crown. Usually it has ceremonial significance and represents victory or authority. The term corolla and/or corollæ appears in a chapter title in Pliny the Elder's Naturalis Historia: "Who invented the art of making garlands: When they first received the name of 'corollæ,' and for what reason."[1] From Latin corōlla ‎(“small garland, chaplet or wreath”), diminutive of corōna ‎(“garland, chaplet, wreath”) The Earth’s atmosphere and ocean exhibit numerous instances of horizontal motions along curved paths. Near-surface winds spiral into low-pressure areas and out of high-pressure areas. Ocean currents flow in huge almost circular gyres thousands of kilometers across. Other objects, including planes and boats, freely moving horizontally almost everywhere on Earth (except at the equator) turn right or left. The turning of these moving object’s paths as seen from our vantage point on Earth is the Coriolis effect. In physics, the Coriolis effect is the apparent deflection of moving objects when the motion is described relative to a rotating reference frame. In a reference frame with clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the left of the motion of the object; in one with counter-clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the right. Although recognized previously by others, the mathematical expression for the Coriolis force appeared in an 1835 paper by French scientist Gaspard-Gustave Coriolis, in connection with the theory of water wheels. Early in the 20th century, the term Coriolis force began to be used in connection with meteorology.

The Corolla Effect Pic
Involucrum Blue Pic

Involucrum Blue

in·vo·lu·cre (ĭn′və-lo͞o′kər) n. A group of one or more whorls of bracts beneath a flower or flower cluster. [French, from Latin involūcrum, wrapper, envelope. The modern English word blue comes from Middle English bleu or blewe, from the Old French bleu, a word of Germanic origin, related to the Old High German word blao. The clear sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. When sunlight passes through the atmosphere, the blue wavelengths are scattered more widely by the oxygen and nitrogen molecules, and more blue comes to our eyes. Involucrum Pronunciation: in′vō-lū′krŭm, -loo′kră 1. An enveloping membrane, a sheath or sac.

Involucrum Blue Pic
Spadix Pic

.Spadix

In botany, a spadix (pronounced /ˈspeɪdɪks/, "SPAY-dicks"; plural spadices /speɪˈdaɪsiːz/, "spay-DIE-seez") is a type of spike inflorescence having small flowers borne on a fleshy stem. Spadices are typical of the family Araceae, the arums or aroids. The spadix is typically surrounded by a leaf-like curved bract known as a spathe. For example, the "flower" of the well known Anthurium spp. is a typical spadix with a large colorful spathe.

Spadix Pic
The Whorl Pic

The Whorl

In botany, a whorl is an arrangement of sepals, petals, leaves, stipules or branches that radiate from a single point and surround or wrap around the stem.A whorl consists of at least three elements; a pair of opposite leaves is not called a whorl. whorl c.1460, "flywheel or pulley on a spindle," perhaps an alteration of whirl. Meaning "circle of leaves or flowers round a stem of a plant" is first recorded 1551. Of seashells or other spiral structures.

The Whorl Pic
Nava Panicle

Nava Panicle

Nava A Hebrew name for a girl, meaning "beautiful" panicle A panicle is a much-branched inflorescence.[1] Some authors distinguish it from a compound spike, by requiring that the flowers (and fruit) be pedicellate. The branches of a panicle are often racemes. A panicle may have determinate or indeterminate growth.

Nava Panicle
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